2017 Jeroen Doorenweerd meets Gutai

Parts Project, The Hague, Netherlands

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“Gutai art does not change the material but brings it to life.” Yoshihara Jirō, 1956 One artist painted with his foot using thick oils. Another writhed in mud. A third smashed bottles of paint on a canvas. The members of the Japanese avant-garde group Gutai (1954–1972) were famous for making paintings in which the artist’s action was an inextricable part of the work. “Painting action, not action painting,” they called it. Gutai’s radical ideas and works were early forerunners of happenings, performance and conceptual art. The Dutch artist Jeroen Doorenweerd (b. 1962) feels a kinship with the Japanese group, despite the decades and thousands of kilometres between them. Jeroen Doorenweerd Meets Gutai brings together two worlds, displaying video footage of works by Gutai artists including Shimamoto Shōzō, Shiraga Kazuo and Tanaka Atsuko alongside Doorenweerd’s latest series of paintings, Ultramarine and Pinkorange.