1994 Veranda - Pablo Casals / Robert Johnson

Installation for the exhibition 'Vista - Solitary Visions / Dynamic Views', curated by Fundament Foundation, Park Wolfslaar, Breda, the Netherlands

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Leo Copers, Berlinde de Bruyckere, Jeroen Doorenweerd, Michael Jacklin, Ann Veronica Janssens, Gereon Lepper, Patchwork, Patrick Raynaud, Rombouts & Droste, Piet Stockmans, Dre Wapenaar “Wolfslaar according to Bach; but far more sensational is the apparently idea-less observation point created by Jeroen Doorenweerd (Terneuzen, 1962). You walk towards a shed made of of galvanised iron plates in a wooden construction. You open a door and all at once you find yourself in a space which is completely open on one side. Behind you is Wolfslaar Park and in front appears an amazing vista of meadows and, even further away, the church tower of Bavel. You are still standing in the park, in an urban culture which you have also left behind you and you see before you, concentrated by Doorenweerd’s veranda, a distant view of the countryside, of which you are not part. You are a spectator, abandoned to your own thoughts and for a moment you feel you are on a grandstand, built especially for you, with a view just for you, at this moment. You realise how crazy the situation is; if you hadn’t been standing in Jeroen Doorenweerd’s observation point, which isolates you from your surroundings, but were simply standing at the edge of the park, you would never have seen what you are seeing now. And yet he has not changed anything in the view, only in the circumstances that we apparently need to be able to see. And as you consider all this you suddenly become intensely aware of the delightful music coming from the loudspeaker. The 6 suites for cello from J.S. Bach, played by the virtuoso Pablo Casals, interspersed with music from the 20th century Robert Johnson. This extraordinary location makes you feel that you have never enjoyed Bach’s cello music so much, and that your perception of the Brabantine landscape has never been so intense. Because of the artist’s intervention something ordinary, that you would normally pass by without noticing, has become a sensation.” (Frits de Coninck, reporting in De Stem)